Accepting your darkest emotions is the key to reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety, and improving mental well-being — Quartz

Rumi, the 13th-century Sufi poet, famously compared emotions—”a joy, a depression, a meanness”—to “unexpected visitors.” His advice was to let them in laughing, but that’s not what we do. Instead, we pretend not to notice, or even hide. We want to bury resentment and anger, or trade loneliness in for the more fashionable gratitude.

In a cultural age that’s decidedly pro-positivity, the pressure to suppress or camouflage negative feelings is real.

Source: Accepting your darkest emotions is the key to reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety, and improving mental well-being — Quartz

I would have to agree with this. In my humble opinion, if we are not accepting all of our emotions, we are actually putting up a facade; showing a fake self. Over time, it becomes more difficult to keep up the illusion and it creates a negative feedback loop. This can create resentment or even physical symptoms such as high blood pressure.

This does not mean you should turn green and tear your clothes when you get angry. It also does not mean that you resign yourself to stressful situations when it is something you can control. It means that when faced with negative emotions, you accept them for what they are and to not deny that you are having them.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: